Last edited by Dusida
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

5 edition of Steam whaling in the western Arctic found in the catalog.

Steam whaling in the western Arctic

John R. Bockstoce

Steam whaling in the western Arctic

by John R. Bockstoce

  • 335 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Old Dartmouth Historical Society in New Bedford, Mass .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Herschel Island (Yukon),
  • Alaska.
    • Subjects:
    • Whaling -- Alaska,
    • Whaling ships,
    • Herschel Island (Yukon)

    • Edition Notes

      StatementJohn R. Bockstoce, with contributions by William A. Baker and Charles F. Batchelder.
      ContributionsBaker, William A., joint author., Batchelder, Charles F. 1898-1973., Old Dartmouth Historical Society., New Bedford Whaling Museum.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSH383.2 .B6
      The Physical Object
      Pagination127 p. :
      Number of Pages127
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4563326M
      LC Control Number77076785

      “It is a curious thing that in whaling vessels the Church of England Prayer book is always employed, though there is never a member of that Church among officers or crew. Our men are all Roman Catholics or Presbyterians, the former predominating. ships combined bay whaling off Siberia with a short voyage into the Chukchi Sea. Expansion of the main American whaling fleet into the Arctic Ocean was the natural outcome of a steady northward search for whales from one hunting ground to another. Geo-graphical knowledge of the Western Arctic gained from British exploration ships, the reward money.

      Whales, Ice, and Men: The History of Whaling in the Western Arctic: John R. Bockstoce: Books - 5/5(2). Western Arctic bowhead whales are distributed in seasonally ice-covered waters of the Arctic and near-Arctic, generally north of 60 N and south of 75 N in the western Arctic Basin (Braham , Moore and Reeves ). For management purposes, four stocks of bowhead whales have been recognized worldwide by the International Whaling.

      The western Arctic opened for whaling in It offered an untapped resource for whales, their blubber and bones. Whaling was already a formidable industry, bringing commercially-desirable. Both the survivors of Barentsz’ expedition as well as other explorers such as Henry Hudson brought home with them the tales of the rich whaling grounds of the arctic seas. It took only a few years until the first whalers of several European nations, most importantly England and .


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Steam whaling in the western Arctic by John R. Bockstoce Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Steam whaling in the western Arctic. [John R Bockstoce; William A Baker; Charles F Batchelder; Old Dartmouth Historical Society (New Bedford, Mass.); New Bedford Whaling Museum.] -- History of American whaling in the western arctic from to Includes ship design, ship biographies and a chronological list of wintering voyages The four chapters are: Steam Whaling in the Western Arctic by John R.

Bockstoce; The Design and Construction of Steam Whalers by William A. Baker; Ship Biographies by Bockstoce; and A Chronological List of Commercial Wintering Voyages, by Bockstoce and Charles F. Batchelder.5/5(2).

Good. pages, Quarto. Includes Acknowledgments, Introduction, Bibliography, and Index, as well as chapters on Steam Whaling in the Western Arctic, The Design and Construction of Steam Whalers, Ship Biographies, and A Chronological List of Commercial Wintering Voyages, Also contains Bibliography and Index.

This is THE book to read about Yankee bowhead whaling in the western arctic. Bockstoce is not only a great scholar, he when whaling with the Point Hope Native hunters in the s (prior to the Marine Mammal Protection Act), and has sailed and boated through most of the western Arctic where Yankee whaling took place/5(10).

Steam whaling in the western Arctic by J. Bockstoce, William Albert Baker, Charles F. Batchelder, Old Dartmouth Historical Society starting at $ Steam whaling in the western Arctic has 0 available edition to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

Get this from a library. Whales, ice, and men: the history of whaling in the western Arctic. [John R Bockstoce; New Bedford Whaling Museum.] -- Steam whaling in the western Arctic book of native and commercial whaling of the bowhead whale in the waters of the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort seas.

Includes chapter on Herschel Island (p). Well illustrated by black and. Bockstoce, John R. Steam Whaling in the Western Arctic. New Bedford, MA: Old Dartmouth Historical Society, New Bedford [MA[ Daily Mercury, undated article glued into Account Book of William Rotch.

New Bedford Whaling Museum Research Library, New. American Whalers in the Western Arctic; The Final Epoch of the Great American Sailing Whaling Fleet.

Fairhaven: Edward J. Lefkowicz, 12 color plates by William Gilkerson, text Illus. viii, 48pp. Oblong elephant folio, publisher's 1/2 blue leather with blue cloth. The whaling fishery. Leavitt arrived in the Canadian Arctic in the late nineteenth century as the New England and San Francisco-based whaling fleet pursued their targets into the frozen northern seas.

The oil-bearing bones in the heads of bowhead whales were highly sought-after and brought large profits to the whalers. Captains of the whaling ships (first sail, and later steam powered) would. Whaling began in the Davis Strait region of the Arctic in the 17th century.

Dutch, German, English and Scottish whalers largely confined their efforts to the eastern (Greenland) side until the expeditions of John Ross () and W. Edward Parry () crossed Baffin Bay and showed the way to Lancaster Sound. NOAA archaeologists recently discovered the battered hulls of two s whaling ships nearly years after they and 31 others sank off the Arctic coast of Alaska in one of the planet's most unexplored ocean regions.

The shipwrecks, and parts of other ships, that were found are most likely the remains of 33 ships trapped by pack ice close to the Alaskan Arctic shore in September Home» Explore» Grimshaw-Gudewicz Reading Room and Archives» Logbooks and Journals» Introduction to Whaling Logbooks and Journals.

Introduction to Whaling Logbooks and Journals. By Rachel Adler, Intern, New Bedford Whaling Museum. Digitized logbooks from the Museum’s collection. A logbook is the official record of the activities of a whaling voyage.

As whaling in the Western Arctic was approaching the turn of the century, the technology had changed, the ships looked different - the era of steam whaling had arrived -- gone were the stalwart crews of whalemen - replaced thieves, beggars and those unlucky enough to be pressed into service - and the captains were not much better.

Split Tooth by Tanya Tagaq Viking, $ Reviewed by Paddy Eason It's my impression that many readers of the Arctic Book Review are seeking stirring tales of exploration from long that basis, this book - which contains enthusiastic teenage solvent abuse, erotic encounters with wild animals and gleeful retribution against human bullies and predators - may not be everyone's cup of tea.

Steam Whaling in the Western Arctic, John A. Bockstoce. New Bedford, Massachusetts: Old Dartmouth Historical Society, Bowhead whale hunting from to its decline 30 years later is detailed.

Excellent photographs of whaling ships are included. A section is devoted to the design and construction of steam whalers.

Biographical Note. Hartson Hartlett Bodfish was born in West Tisbury, Massachusetts, in about First going to sea in on the steam whaling bark Belvedere, he made a career of whaling in the Arctic region and eventually became captain of several vessels, notably the steam barks Beluga and h also acted as a trader who supplied Arctic whalemen and natives in the area with.

The Samuel Call Collection contains early images of the North Slope and the Western Arctic coast of Alaska along with photographs of Siberia. (Steamboat) Pilot House Logbook.

(Pacific Steam Whaling Company Pilot House Log Book). USUAFV Newport¸ which was sailing for the Pacific Steam Whaling Company in Oliver, Ethel Author: Gwendolyn Higgins.

The Sperm whale was the main target at first, Rorquals are another specie that was hunted after development in equipment, Steam boats and explosive harpoons, invented by Norwegian Sven Foyn, helped. Rorquals were mostly hunted in the southern waters but also in the Arctic fringe. In the International Whaling Commission halted whale hunting.

In the pages that follow, the story of commercial whaling in the western Arctic is told by a scholar intimately acquainted with the terrain--not only as it can be found in the historical records or at archaeological sites, but from lone experience on the shores /5.

The Harvest of Pacific Walruses by the Pelagic Whaling Industry, to Article (PDF Available) in Arctic and Alpine Research 14(3) August with 39 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Whaling began in prehistoric times in coastal earliest depictions of whaling are the Neolithic Bangudae Petroglyphs in Korea, which may date back to BC.

These images are the earliest evidence for whaling. Although prehistoric hunting and gathering is generally considered to have had little ecological impact, early whaling in the Arctic may have altered freshwater ecology.This is the first book to exhibit the photographs taken by 3rd Lt.

Charles Kennedy of New Bedford, introducing rarely seen photos of the last sail-and-steam whaling ships, capturing early interactions of Natives with white whalemen and explorers, and showing lives otherwise lost to time.In August40 whaling ships from Hawaii, New England, and California had come to an area north of Wainwright Inlet along the Chukchi Sea coast in the pursuit of the bowhead whale.

The pack ice being close to shore that year left little room for maneuvering of the fleet. The whaling captains.